L.A. Kennedy

Beyond the story

Here are a few lucky words that have been preserved in common English expressions. Mental Floss Image credit: miss_j / iStock / Getty Images Plus. English has changed a lot in the last several hundred years, and there are many words once used that we would no longer recognize today. For whatever reason, we started …

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Katisha Smith Here at Book Riot, we are obviously into books. We love all books equally, but sometimes prefer a certain format when it comes to reading.  Some Rioters detest hardcover books. Others love mass market paperbacks. Of course, we know audiobooks are more than just a trend. Personally, I prefer reading ebooks because I …

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In his fiction column from the January 1990 issue of Writer’s Digest, author Lawrence Block explores the reality behind the saying, “Truth is stranger than fiction.” Amy Jones A couple of years ago, two friends of mine, a man and woman I’d known for most of a decade, made the papers. They did so in …

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Don’t feed the trolls. Quartz Olivia Goldhill Wildly inaccurate facts and spurious arguments are unavoidable features of social media. Yet no matter how infuriatingly wrong someone is, or just how much counter-evidence you have at your disposal, starting arguments on the internet rarely gets anyone to change their mind. Nearly a century-and-a-half ago, British philosopher …

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Jeanette Solomon When I started thinking about this piece, I thought about it as just a list of my (many!) seemingly arbitrary rules for reading. Once I got started, though, I discovered that those rules actually tell you so much about me that they double as personality traits. In fact, they say so much about …

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A.A. Newton Everyone who writes for fun or profit dreads sitting down to work only to end up staring at a blank document for hours on end. Writer’s block comes for us all eventually, but the solution could have been lurking in your font menu this entire time. While my cooking style is best described …

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Literature’s evolution has reflected and spurred the growing complexity of society. By Julie Sedivy Reading medieval literature, it’s hard not to be impressed with how much the characters get done—as when we read about King Harold doing battle in one of the Sagas of the Icelanders, written in about 1230. The first sentence bristles with …

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Why aren’t there more people studying the science behind stupidity? Nautilus | Brian Gallagher Bertrand Russell’s quip prefigured the scientific discovery of a cognitive bias—the Dunning–Kruger effect—that has been so resonant that it has penetrated popular culture. Photo from Wikicommons. On this past International Holocaust Remembrance Day, I reread a bit of Bertrand Russell. In …

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According to a 15th century guide to detecting and eradicating witchcraft, witches were capable of making penises vanish—and some even kept them in nests and fed them oats. by Callie Beusman Photo via Wikipedia Since time immemorial, men have worried irrationally about perceived threats to their penises. Long before there was castration anxiety, there was …

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Via WriterMag I wish I’d known a writer can fix anything but a blank page. I wish I’d known the best writing comes from the gut and not from the head. I wish I’d known that, to find your voice, you have to write every day, read every day, and get out of your comfort …

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